The Mosaic

June 30, 2014

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

(972) 369-0577

www.rosenthalwadas.com

Many criminal cases can be analogized to a mosaic.

A mosaic can have hundreds if not thousands of small tiles of all different colors, shapes and textures.  Someone doesn’t even have to be very skilled to arrange the tiles in a way to create the picture they see in their mind’s eye.

Similarly a criminal case often has hundreds of bits of information such as witness accounts, video tape, or scientific evidence.  A person interpreting all of the scattered information, too, can and will create a picture based on their initial impression of what they see in their mind.

This is where the analogy gets interesting — the mosaic is all based on the perception of the person interpreting the bits and pieces.  

Let’s say the person making the picture is a law enforcement officer who decided guilt before even looking at the pieces.  That person would naturally take the pieces he or she needed to make the picture they want and potentially discard pieces which don’t fit their vision.  They don’t do it to be mean or to frame someone — it’s just how people think.  For instance, most police reports simply don’t contain many positive facts for my client.  It’s not that there isn’t good evidence for my client the officer knows about — it just got ignored like a tile piece which got left on the floor and swept into a pile.  

The good news is we have the ability to do the same thing to give a jury, judge or even the prosecutor a COMPLETE picture.  We can make a mosaic which we know reflects how we see the picture — only we won’t discard pieces just because they don’t seem to matter to us.

*Jeremy Rosenthal is an attorney licensed to practice in the State of Texas.  Nothing in this article should be considered as legal advice.  For legal advice about any situation you should contact an attorney directly.  Communications sent through this blog are not privileged.


Criminal Credit or Debit Card Abuse

June 17, 2014

Criminal Defense Lawyer | DWI, Drug, Theft & Assault Charges

By Collin County Criminal Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

It’s not a crime to be irresponsible with your credit cards.  It is a crime to use someone else’s credit card without their consent.

Credit or debit card abuse is defined by Texas Penal Code 32.31 which holds, in part, beginning in subsection (b);

(b)  A person commits an offense if:

(1)  with intent to obtain a benefit fraudulently, he presents or uses a credit card or debit card with knowledge that:

(A)  the card, whether or not expired, has not been issued to him and is not used with the effective consent of the cardholder; or

(B)  the card has expired or has been revoked or cancelled;

The code lists out several other ways credit or debit card abuse can be committed other than just using someone else’s credit card.  Other examples include using fictitious credit cards, possessing someone else’s credit card without…

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Computer Crimes in Texas: Online Harassment

June 5, 2014

Criminal Defense Lawyer | DWI, Drug, Theft & Assault Charges

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

Laws lag behind online crimes. Society gets outraged when stories come on the news about online bullying, for example, but the truth is that the legislature naturally plays catch-up to technology.

Who knew Facebook or Twitter would become as popular as they’ve become… Much less had the foresight to know how to keep people from victimizing one another just two or three years ago?

One recent step taken by Texas is the addition of Texas Penal Code Section 33.07 which criminalizes “online harassment.” That statute was passed several legislative sessions ago and it criminalizes the creation of an account on a social networking site that not only isn’t you — but is purportedly someone else (or their persona) and was created for the express purpose to harm, defraud, intimidate or threaten ANY person.

The punishment for such an offense would be…

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