Defending Intoxicated Assault and Intoxicated Manslaughter

October 23, 2013

Criminal Defense Lawyer | DWI, Drug, Theft & Assault Charges

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

Defending intoxication assault or intoxication manslaughter is heavy lifting for lawyers and not just anyone can do it.

Like any other major criminal case, it requires attention to detail, the ability to compartmentalize the human components of the case, and the ability to thoroughly analyze the mountains of evidence as a baseline.

On top of that — a lawyer must have an advanced background in defending not only severe car accident cases requiring reconstruction; but more importantly defending intoxication charges which involve science ranging from chemistry to physiology, to pharmacology.

Intoxicated assault is governed by Texas Penal Code 49.07 and Intoxicated Manslaughter is under 49.08.  In those cases in Texas, the state must prove that the accused caused the serious bodily injury (intoxicated assault) or the death of a person (intoxicated manslaughter) by reason of that intoxication

The…

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Do I need an Attorney for a Theft Case in Texas?

October 21, 2013

Criminal Defense Lawyer | DWI, Drug, Theft & Assault Charges

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

Yes, even if they’re accusing you of taking a penny.

Being convicted or even getting deferred adjudication on a theft case is bad news in Texas.  There are countless unseen consequences.

It is one of a handful of charges that the stigma attached to your criminal record in practically every case is worse than any punishment if you are convicted or get deferred.

Not only that, but the judicial system and many governmental agencies consider theft to be a “crime of moral terptitude.”  This can cause wide ranging problems from immigration consequences to professional licensing denial or suspension such as being a doctor, lawyer, or any other job that requires a license such as nursing or being a real estate agent.

Explaining a theft away on your criminal record is a hard thing to do whether it was a…

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Why You Shouldn’t Represent Yourself in a DWI

October 18, 2013

Criminal Defense Lawyer | DWI, Drug, Theft & Assault Charges

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

Here’s why:

DWI Laws Are Nastier Than You Think

The laws against DWI are getting nastier and nastier with no end in sight.  My clients hear me repeat the phrase, “no politician ever got elected in Texas promising to go easy on DUI cases.”

Many people arrested for DWI feel they were wrong and should take responsibility for their mistake.  While this is an extremely admirable trait — it assumes the price for taking responsibility isn’t cruel and thoughtless.

The one thing the legislature can’t take away from you is your constitutional right to an advocate.  It’s the only way to try and level the playing field.

Don’t Assume Your Arrest is a Lost Cause

First, as any prosecutor will tell you, DWI’s can and do very frequently end in acquittals.  Jurors are just like you.  In a DWI…

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Can They Make Me Testify Against My Spouse?

October 17, 2013

Criminal Defense Lawyer | DWI, Drug, Theft & Assault Charges

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

In Texas the prosecution can and will force one spouse to testify against another — often against their will.  I am often asked in disbelief in assault cases “can they really do this?”  Unfortunately the answer is, “yes.”

Texas Rule of Evidence 504 governs the husband-wife privilege.  Generally speaking, any communication made to one’s spouse is privileged under that rule during and even after the marriage.  Either spouse may assert the privilege whether they are a party to a case or not.  Unfortunately, the husband-wife privilege is riddled with far more exceptions than other privileges (such as the attorney-client privilege).

Tex.R.Evid. 504(a)(4)(D) is just one of the specific exceptions to this rule of privilege.  That rule states a spouse can be compelled to testify against their other spouse if that spouse is considered the victim of the crime…

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Probation FAQ’s

October 16, 2013

Criminal Defense Lawyer | DWI, Drug, Theft & Assault Charges

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

(972) 369-0577

www.rosenthalwadas.com

Probation (technically called community supervision), is where the Judge suspends all or part of the sentence in a case for a certain period of time.  In the probationary period, the person typically completes community service and other requirements such as classes or drug testing.

A person on probation in Texas must complete and abide by “terms and conditions” of probation.  Typically a person cannot commit an offense against the State of Texas or any other state as a minimum.  Other requirements range from requiring the defendant to report changes in address, changes in employment, and new arrests, if any.

Difference between Deferred and Probation

Deferred adjudication is where you have not been convicted.  Probation is where you have been convicted for the offense.  While on deferred, you must still complete community supervision as if you were on regular probation…

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A Felony Conviction: Legal Cancer

October 14, 2013

Criminal Defense Lawyer | DWI, Drug, Theft & Assault Charges

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

There is no such thing as a small felony.

A felony charge or conviction tells everyone not to hire you, rent to you, or befriend you.

The textbook consequences of felony convictions and deferred adjudications are the punishment ranges for such offenses which include fine and jail time.  But felonies act as trap doors due to the mountains of the collateral civil statutes which gut your rights.

Specific examples of collateral consequences of felonies are their impact on professional licensing.  The Texas State Board of Medical Examiners must suspend licenses for felony convictions.  The State Bar of Texas disbars attorneys convicted of felonies, and the Texas Department of Insurance may not issue a certificate of authority to act as an insurer if a corporate officer, or member of the board of directors has been convicted of a felony involving…

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Occupational Driver’s Licenses for Texas DWIs

October 11, 2013

Criminal Defense Lawyer | DWI, Drug, Theft & Assault Charges

By Collin County Criminal Defense Lawyer Jeremy Rosenthal

www.rosenthalwadas.com

(972) 369-0577

What is an Occupational Driver’s License?

In Texas, an occupational license (also known as an ODL) is a temporary permit allowing people to drive while their license has been suspended due to a breath test refusal or breath test failure in a DWI situation.

How Can I Get an Occupational Driver’s License?

An occupational license is attained through a civil petition (basically a civil lawsuit) which a judge must approve.  The Judge can allow someone to drive for 4 hours a day (but can extend that to 12 hours a day upon showing of “essential need.”)  The court order, by law, must contain the times and routes of travel.  Judges can also order other provisions such as interlock devices be placed on cars during the occupational period for DWI cases.

For those with irregular travel due to work…

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